Cannes Short Film Market

Getting a film into Cannes is an accomplishment no doubt worth crowing about, however, most filmmakers squander their golden opportunity without a plan. Instead, images of all night parties on yachts and exclusive parties are the sugar plums dancing in their heads instead of finding a way to give your film status at a market like Cannes.

This is especially and vividly true when I visited the the Short Film corner that was unbelievably crowded with very little opportunity for anyone to take any time in this underbelly of film market universe. I had been there two times in a row with the first being a way to learn the ropes just as I learned from a Cape May film festival friend and filmmaker, Jill Wisoff, who sent me some interesting notes that I keep on file–

I suggest joining the Cannes network if you aren’t on at cinando.com which gives you the access to everything and you can register early for Cannes and you have access to every buyer, seller, distributor, participant in the market and as well through Berlin and AFM markets including lists of the companies, the films they rep, etc. This list also prints out in the yearly Cannes market book people use all year. I don’t know at what point they post prices for rental but for the cheapest way to give status to your film. You can rent a screening for the Cannes market in advance. They rent in the Gray d’Albion, a luxury boutique hotel, the Palais screening rooms and the Riviera I think… The Palais is a good place because people can find it easily compared to the Gray d’Albion screening rooms. Screening rentals ran from about 300 or so to 900 maybe more US; but, the point is if you rent for ONE screening, your film gets listed in the Cannes guides and in a number of the trade papers that list all market screenings plus the daily Cannes screening guides passed out to the 80,000 or so in hotels and throughout the region that attend the market. That’s a lot of eyeballs. I learned what to do by going a year earlier to Cannes (on the advice of a major producer rep I talked to) and scoped it all out…I also have a good friend who’s a boutique indie distributor so I sort of got the lay of the land and advice to screen there. Believe me, before I even decided to make my film I was already well on my way to learning what I could about distributing at least on the small scale by accompanying one distributor’s company to Sundance and helping just to learn. Get all the listings that go with it it’s easiest to arrange the screening a small indie ad in the trades will cost more in any case and this way you cover all your trades AND have a screening…again I suggest rent a small screening room in the Palais which really has people showing up to get into screenings all the time…you can give your choice of day and time (most market people leave by the 7th day of the festival though the festival goes to the Sunday so be aware you want to book maybe through the first Saturday through the following Tuesday when industry is still around). An article called “You Cannes Do It” about indie filmmakers and how to promote at Cannes and why we decided to do it etc…none of it is hard, difficult or a mystery. Filmmakers continually have to sell and distribute their own films and have to become our own promo/distribution machines and that includes doing what all big and small distributors have done at Cannes and other markets for decades. While many filmmakers opt to do the festival circuit more so for their Facebook page, what some have discovered in the long run is it’s so much more costly and maybe not as effective going the festival route when you can reach the entire industry and name recognition with one little screening at Cannes. Those five or so, smaller regional film festivals that are hard to come by these days for a feature usually aren’t going to get you a distributor deal anyway unless you win at Sundance and even then…well you know the story these days. The festival people at Cannes can be contacted any time and they’ll advise. They make it very easy to arrange your screening. You can do it all online, but as I said, I don’t know at what point you reserve a screening. I might have done so around February or March, but don’t wait if you don’t have to.
Let me know if I can help in any other way… Very nice to meet you as well there! 
Best, Jill Wisoff

In any event, sitting in the Short Film corner will not get you very far. Just as a filmmaker mentioned that he doesn’t go to Sundance because if he doesn’t get into the parties, it’s not worth going at all. I couldn’t help it, but I totally disagreed. There’s more to it that meets the eye and worth every moment of the film festival experience. I’ll have to dig up more on this topic as I keep hearing similar stories from filmmakers who have gone to Cannes with their short film and came back a bit shortsighted. Lessons learned.

Art of the Film Festival Experience Part II

What happens during film festivals when a perfect alignment of writers, directors, actors, key industry players turn out for a networking social event? Powerful connections born under the stars. It happens more than inexperienced film festival organizers realize.

Navigating through Netflix last week, I came across Frozen River, its opening scene to this day, remains one of the most riveting. A closeup of a visibly distraught character Ray Eddy’s face (Melissa Leo) tells the whole story – desperation after a husband abandons his family taking all the money saved for their home, a double-wide trailer. What she and another down-on- her-luck woman, Lila Littlewolf, (Misty Upham), a Mohawk bingo-parlor employee, do to make money (smuggling across the northern international border) to keep their families together is strikingly similar to the hazardous decisions people make today in their attempts for a better life.

I first saw Frozen River at Sundance 2008 and then at the Lake Placid Film Forum. Writer-director Courtney Hunt was much praised and Melissa Leo won critical acclaim including the Best Actress award from the Independent Spirit Awards, New York Film Critics Circle Award, Sundance Film Festival and many others during that year on the film festival circuit.

It was, however, the 2007 Woodstock Film Festival in October that I remember watching Melissa at a social networking event where I noticed her intensity, her serious face to face conversations with individuals, huddled over drinks, talking strategy for the making of a film that could have a major impact on audiences and critics alike.

FilmFestivViews@Lake Placid Melissa Leo on Frozen River Episode 054

It was impressive to see the team at Lake Placid for a Q&A after the screening. Later, I asked to do a podcast with Melissa and did so at her home in Stone Ridge, NY. I was already a Melissa Leo fan since the television series, Homicide: Life on the Street. It was during my years living in the Washington, DC area, the series was set in Baltimore, a tough area at the time. Her role as Detective Sergeant Kay Howard was my hero. She was a tough cookie, no make up, no nonsense, worked hard, knew her stuff, acted decisively and was respected by rank and file members of the police force.

We talked about her boldness in taking such character roles. Seemingly written exclusively for her or because she makes the character so much her own? I believe she draws upon hellish ordeals that reflect the character’s angst and recourse. Powerfully intuitive as an actor. It wasn’t long after her performance in Frozen River, there came focus of public and media attention earning her several nominations and awards, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Whew.

Following the Frozen River viewing on Netflix, I had to watch another one with Melissa in it. Lo and behold, Yuri Turchyn and I watched The Fighter, (2010) where she won several awards for her performance as Alice Eklund-Ward. Winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, The Fighter grossed $93 million in U.S. and Canada. In other territories, it collected $35 million, for a worldwide total of $129 million. Not bad.

In 2017, I wanted Yuri to have the best film festival experience ever, so it was off to the Sundance Film Festival. On January 20, we watched the premiere of Novitiate. Set in the early 1960s, it’s a story of the effect the Vatican II council had on the Catholic Church as seen through the eyes of a hard core, old-fashioned Mother Superior, Reverend Mother Marie Saint-Clair, played by non other, tough cookie with heart and soul, Melissa Leo. Just as the first time in 2008, I walked away from the screening talking for hours afterwards about the story, the writing, direction, its main characters, another superb performance. The rest of Sundance 2017 is part of another amazing story.

What makes this assemblage so consequential is the knowledgeable and competent festival directors’ and film programmers’ understanding for bringing together the elements and people allowing such remarkable projects to take shape. It can become quite the springboard of success for actors and the filmmakers adding positive reputation to the film festival. When it does happen, the festival director may feel the satisfaction of a seasoned matchmaker in their after parties and/or award events. Ultimately, creating opportunity for filmmakers is more important than just selling tickets for the bottom line. It makes for another great film festival experience.

Art of the Film Festival Experience Part I

I live for the film festival experience.

My earliest recollections of a log-line was in the TV Guide planning my weekly program viewing. Soon, I began writing log lines for titles coming out of my imagination and continued throughout high school and college– reading, writing, and immersing in cinematic culture. Art and foreign films saved the vaudeville theater houses and going to the movie theater became an integral part of my visceral link for storytelling. As more theaters turned to porn films for their survival, the film festival became the place to see films that would never make the Hollywood extortionist distribution racket at the box office. Instead, a richness involving the back story replaced the concession stand, behind-the-scenes discussions supplanted the celebrity gossip columnist and the independent filmmaker broke out of the big name studio’s vise-like grip developing cult followings, eventually finding their way into general audiences.

I witnessed this happening in 1989 during the Sundance Film Festival three years after it was overhauled from being the U.S. Film Festival. Our ski trip members were able to buy tickets the same day at the Egyptian Theater in Park City. Thirty years later, Sundance brings in $60 million for Utah, with over fifty thousand film festival aficionados descending upon the super well coordinated ten day event. Having attended the festival for more than a decade, I can say I have had an incredible film festival experience on more than one occasion and was responsible for others having the best film festival experience imaginable.

Returning to school a decade later, American University, Washington DC, opened the film industry world to me with a real life education about budgets and pre production, scripts and schedules, marketing and distribution, theatrical exhibition as well as, and especially, film festival exposure. Subscribing to Hollywood Reporter and Variety for film industry news and reviews was mandatory. It was imperative to understand the industry from the big studio perspective because that’s where the money was.

Three months after completing a master’s degree in Producing for Film and Video, finishing a documentary, and being a TA during AU’s School of Communications summer course in filmmaking, 9/11 happened. Hard to recall those dark days, but any money for anything related to filmmaking, digital media or marketing dried up completely. Scraping by, good things did spring out of the devastation, like the Tribeca Film Festival– rebuilding the neighborhood and community, annually reshaping, reworking, reorganizing into a strong festival. While we still have not been able to calculate the total loss of life and loved ones throughout the years, new technology and cinematic voices arose from the ashes. I have attended almost every one of Tribeca’s Film Festivals learning from them, reviewing many fascinating diverse topics that would never reach theatrical exhibition. The big name studios took notice of the independent film movement gaining traction and opened a few studios as an independent arm under their studio system. It didn’t last very long.

The seismic shift began in the winter 2007 during my tenure as account executive for a digital cinema network, Emerging Pictures/Emerging Cinemas. Within six months, almost all of the independent “arms” shut down. The affiliates, mostly historic theaters saved and supported by film societies, suffered during the downturn in the 2008 Wall Street meltdown. Another setback, but ultimately, more opportunity for film festivals to turn to their communities for support and strengthening their local independent film productions with fundraising and collective solidarity.

Many film festivals started out in the Hollywood celebrity-centered, style with glitz and glamour, red carpet, Gala Opening Night, a weekend of box office-quality films, after-party receptions, awards ceremonies, etc. having the disadvantage of often becoming an insular Garden club variety event or a founding person’s vanity project– a same old, same old annual weekend that exhausts everyone– the festival organizers, their volunteers, filmmakers, donors/supporters/sponsors, and finally the audience.

Whereas the past several years has shown a transition and makeover of what a film festival grows into by embracing new technology, welcoming accomplished film festival organizers with the know-how and ability for recognizing valuable skills volunteers have to offer. Utilizing skills in the best possible way ensures that film festivals can evolve into a solid cultural and viable entity contributing to the economic development for its local businesses and arts community. Does the film festival of today support what the film festival philosophy purports– that the power of storytelling and film draws the community closer together? Can it demonstrate an ability to grow steadily and become highly desirable for the next generation of filmmakers, solidifying regional film industries thus continuing a positive economic impact? I believe it’s possible.

Another seismic shift is on the horizon as the independent film industry readies to completely break from the behemoth Hollywood studio system whose tent pole movies keep the concession stands buzzing on opening weekend soon fading into obscurity. That’s why I live for the film festival experience. It lasts much longer and with greater satisfaction. Stay tuned.

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Get Back To It Episode 103

Christina@TribecaFF2019My Tribeca Film Festival Adventure Part One (probably 16th annual) started on Friday taking a two hour train from Port Jervis, New York to Hoboken. There, I was able to afford a place to stay hopping over to Manhattan via the PATH train. My goal, such as it is for any film festival outside of my daily driving ability, was to find the Registration room, pick up my badge and get the lay of the land, jumping right into the action as the first weekend is usually insanely fast paced.

According to the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival (April 24th to May 5th), info on their Squarespace redesigned website (for the second year as a sponsor), the 18th annual festival planned a showcase of works from emerging and new works from returning filmmakers. It was programmed from more than 9,295 submissions. “Our goal each year is to strike a balance between discovering new talent and showcasing new projects by notable filmmakers and storytellers.” I really don’t know how that would be possible. During the months before the festival, I had been inundated with press releases, updates, invites to the “red carpet only” (which I always mark down as “not interested”) special events and, what I had hoped for, more networking with the film industry, hence my upgrade to an Industry pass, this year.

The lineup included 81 World, three International, eight North American, one U.S., and ten New York premieres. Also 42 first-time filmmakers and 19 Tribeca alums returned to the Festival with their latest projects. Why does this matter? Most film festivals strive for being the first to show a film believing it draws people to purchase tickets, most likely online purchases. It becomes a game for their competition as other festivals plan and promote their line up and the timing of films finished and released is paramount for the next step. Timing is everything for when and where films screen often so they may be in a solid place for contention whether it is for an Oscar, a great international distribution deal, or streaming VOD deals.

This year’s features program included 103 films from 124 filmmakers. 50% of the films selected in the three competition sections were directed by women filmmakers. 40% of the feature films have one or more women directors, 29% of the feature films are directed by filmmakers of color, and 13% of the features are by individuals who identify as LGBTQIA. This too, matters, because the glass ceiling remains an elusive call for these filmmakers to come out and shatter it once and for all. While I was a bit surprised that there wasn’t a United Artists Centennial component to the schedule, it reminded me of the Universal debacle a couple years ago where the moderator of the Universal Centennial panel discussion was totally unprepared for any discussion of cinema history and Robert DeNiro looked so uncomfortable tolerating the awkward topics brought up by Judd Apetow. 

However, panels were extremely popular and quickly sold out. A bit pricey at $40 per ticket.

Keeping an eye out for the women directors in features, I found that documentaries ruled in this weekend and evening schedule. They opened the festival and maintained its hold over the course of the first seven days with Opening Night film The Apollo; Friday night Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice; Saturday and Critics Week choice, American Factory; Sunday afternoon, Dog Doc; and in the evening, Halston; Monday, Inndda Back Yard+Performance and Tuesday, Say Anything, retrospective with Cameron Crowe, James L. Brooks, Ione Skye and John Cusack on a Skype screen. Wasn’t sure if I would get to see the premiere of Framing John DeLorean taking it in during a morning Press & Industry screening. The formula works for getting people to come out and stand on line, despite the cold, raw rainy Friday night for the Ronstadt film. Many who tried to buy tickets online found it was Sold Out. As I note in many of my earlier blogs and podcasts, the Sold Out makes the screening more desirable. There isn’t any way out of that, but just as I say “there is always a parking spot,” there is always an extra ticket, somewhere, an empty seat, somewhere, at film festivals. Not everyone can make it and usually the people who have early access to tickets either don’t show up or hand them off to their publicists.

Fortunately for me, the publicist had a ticket for the World Premiere of Dog Doc on a Sunday afternoon, a packed house in Village East Cinemas. Check out the podcast with director Cindy Meehl and an incredibly hard working and funny person in real life as he is in the documentary, Dr. Marty, veterinarian extraordinaire. Coming soon, Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Part Deux.

Tribeca Film Festival 2018 FilmFestivViews Episode 102

CK@Tribeca2018Coming back to the Tribeca Film Festival every year is Home. My backyard from New Jersey and access to some of the most interesting, spine tingling and controversial work programmed for eleven days. As always, we take in as many films as we can; however, this year I had broken my wrist a few weeks before Tribeca and after the surgery had only a week to work the schedule. We opted out of the Virtual Arcade featuring Storyscapes and the Cinema360, but had great impromptu conversations with fellow filmmakers and musicians into the television scene at the Filmmaker Lounge. Solid panels and extra-afternoon activities that are entertaining to watch as we take in the New York view. We also had an opportunity to celebrate Earth Day with receptions for a new way of Green Architecture and engineering and a present day denuclearization. Very awesome. Once Tribeca Hub centered the festival philosophy, it is gratifying to know that the overdone family street fair and the emphasis on sports passed its puberty, and has matured into a classy and sassy film festival that puts their filmmakers upfront, yet turns onto a road where social responsibility must also be weighed when conferring awards onto films that recognize terrorism as legitimate conflicts. We must remain vigilant over media takeover for propaganda purposes. Keep the faith.

Alice Guy Blache’s Life & Times

On Saturday, March 24th, it will be 50 years. Alice Guy Blaché b. July 1, 1873 – d. March 24, 1968.

Alice GuyShe was the first woman film director and the first to make fiction films before women had the right to vote according to Alison McMahon, Alice Guy Blache Lost Visionary of the Cinema, Alice Guy developed narrative film stories at a time when it really didn’t exist. Born July 1, 1873, to French parents, her father owned a chain of bookstores in Chile and her mother returned home to give birth to Alice in Saint-Mandé. They returned to Chile for her early years, remaining there until an earthquake destroyed her father’s bookselling business. While she and her sisters were sent to a boarding school in Convent du Sacré-Coeur, Viry, France 1879–85 for a strict Catholic education, her father encouraged Alice to learn a practical skill so she can always support herself. Taking up stenography, Alice was hired as a secretary by Leon Gaumont for his still photography company in 1894. Gaumont allowed Alice to learn the new technology as long as it didn’t interfere with her secreterial duties. In her spare time, Alice experimented using inventions and techniques for still photography integrating into moving pictures. She became head of production for the Gaumont Film Company between 1896 to 1906 and directed her first film, La Fee aux Choux (The Cabbage Fairy) in 1896. Using Gaumont’s “chronophone,” she made her first sound synchronized and colorized films around 1900. In doing so, Alice Guy became the first woman filmmaker in the world, directing at least 324 films.

Alice Guy married Herbert Blache in 1907 and were sent to start up Gaumont’s Chronophone (sound synced talking film system) business in America. However, American filmmaking and exhibiting seemed behind the times, and it took another three years before Alice creates her own studio, Solax, renting Gaumont’s underused studio space. She gives birth to a daughter, Simone in 1908 and son, Reginald in 1911 when the Solax Company was formed on Lemoine Avenue in Fort Lee, New Jersey.

By 1912, the entire studio and factory, Solax Company, was planned, owned and operated by Madame Alice Guy Blaché. It was completed with an outlay of $100,000 and had all departments. It was large enough to accommodate five stage settings, a shipping department for finished products to be shipped for distribution including printed posters and marketing materials. There were laboratories and dark rooms for film development; a projection room to check product; drying rooms capable of drying 6,000 feet of film at a time. The accessory department included property rooms, scene painting, carpentry shop, costume design. As a director for twenty-eight years, Alice Guy Blaché accomplished things that no one was doing at the time– special effects, super imposition, synchronized sound films between 1902 and 1906. Up until 1912, she was the only woman film director who was producing a consistent body of work in the world.

Herbert Blaché’s contract with Gaumont expired in 1913 and Alice Guy makes him president of Solax so that she can concentrate on writing and directing. After three months, Blaché resigns and starts his own film company, Blaché Features using Solax Company’s factory, inventory and actors eventually superseding Solax production, so that by 1914, Solax Company is virtually defunct. Things go downhill following several bad business deals as well Herbert’s move to Hollywood with Catrine Calvert, an actress, who starred in four films that Alice Guy directed.

After eventual bankruptcy and final divorce proceedings, Alice Guy Blaché returns with her children to France in 1922. Despite her successes, efforts to work in the French film industry do not bear fruit. She returns to the U.S. in 1927 to find copies of her films, but finds none, not even at the Library of Congress where some were copyrighted. When the silent film era ends in 1929, it becomes clear that she will not make films again. She becomes financially dependent on her children, especially her daughter, Simone.

From 1947-1952  Simone and Alice Guy live in Washington D.C. In Georgetown, she begins to seriously work on her memoirs and filmography, and renews the search for her films. She also begins a correspondence with Louis Gaumont, Léon Gaumont’s son and in 1954, Louis Gaumont gives a speech in Paris on “Madame Alice Guy Blaché, the First Woman Filmmaker” whom, he says, “has been unjustly forgotten.” Film historians such as: Jean Mitry, Georges Sadoul, René Jeanne and Charles Ford begin to take notice of her and in 1955, Alice Guy is awarded the Légion d’Honneur, France’s highest nonmilitary honor. On March 16, 1957, Alice Guy is honored in a Cinémathèque Francaise ceremony which goes unnoticed by the press. In 1963, Victor Bachy, the professor who initiated the academic study of cinema in Belgium, meets Alice Guy by accident and begins researching her work. By 1965, Alice Guy and Simone move to Mahwah, New Jersey. On March 24, 1968, Alice Guy Blaché dies in a nursing home at the age of 95 and is buried at Maryrest Cemetery in Mahwah.

By 1976, Alice Guy Blache’s memoirs were published in French, with a filmography by Francis Lacassin. The Memoirs of Alice Guy Blache translated by Roberta and Simone Blaché and edited by Anthony Slide was published in 1986. Publication of Victor Bachy’s Alice Guy-Blaché: La Première femme cinéaste du monde in 1994 and Alice Guy-Blaché: Lost Visionary of the Cinema by Alison McMahon in 2002.

In 2011, Director’s Guild of America bestowed a Special Directorial Award for Lifetime Achievement upon this pioneer filmmaker, Alice Guy Blaché, in recognition of her groundbreaking career as the first female filmmaker and the first filmmaker to develop narrative filmmaking. On July 1, 2012, due to efforts by members of the Fort Lee Film Commission, supporters and friends, a new marker at Maryrest Cemetery reads: Alice Guy Blache – First Woman Motion Picture Director; First Woman Studio Head; President of the Solax Company, Fort Lee, New Jersey.


Susan Lazarus, New York Women in Film & Television (NYWiFT) Women’s Film Preservation Fund.

End-of-Year Strong Women Roles FilmFestivViews Episode 101

Festival Badges


Twelve years ago New Year’s Eve, I put out my first podcast program, Film Festival reViews, a tryst for indie film lovers around the film festival circuit worldwide. Since then, End-of-Year shows highlight the films, festivals, music comings and goings. This year, we focused on a few of the notable and personal preference for strong women roles in all platforms– The Novitiate (Sundance) with a current theatrical screening at the Village East Cinema in New York City through January 4th; Ice Mother (Tribeca Film Festival) an international film from the Czech Republic; Wonder Woman (Box Office sensation) and Gal Gadot’s next project; The Keepers (Netflix Docuseries); The Trouble With Angels (Director, Ida Lupino). Recording and audio engineer and long time musician, Yuri’s music choices reaches into the pocket and pulls out some gems that stays with us for a long time. Looking forward to the coming year’s film festival season. Thanks for listening– become a subscriber! Happy New Year…

Here’s Looking Into Bette Davis’ Eyes FilmFestivViews Episode 100

Wanting more about movie icon, Bette Davis, Christina Kotlar and Yuri Turchyn, co hosts for Film Festival reViews 100th show, went on a 1930s/40s cinema-watching Bette Davis movies binge after witnessing Jessica Sherr’s one-woman show, Bette Davis Ain’t for Sissies. It’s a firecracker of a show where “you fasten your seatbelts– it’s going to be a bumpy night.”

Music and melodrama, professional rivalries, fighting the studio system and life imitating art are among the topics and conversation on some of the films chosen by Yuri– Dangerous, Jezebel, Whatever Happened to Baby Jane and Dark Victory, elusive to Bette Davis’ triple crown Oscar achievement.

So, the Bette Davis Ain’t For Sissies show begins…

Bette Davis Ain't PosterIt’s early evening of the 1939 Academy Awards–young Miss Davis is nominated for Best Actress in Dark Victory, and the Los Angeles Times LEAKS the OSCAR winners EARLY!! “This year Vivian Leigh will take home the Oscar for Best Actress!”… With newspaper in hand the BOLD, DEFIANT and DISILLUSIONED Bette Davis decides to leave! Journey into the young starlet’s battle to win freedom from the grip and control of Hollywood’s studio moguls. Witness Bette’s most defining moments as a tenacious young actor fighting her way to the top!! See what happens when someone who always wins…loses.

Catch Jessica Sherr’s Bette Davis Ain’t For Sissies on Tuesday, Dec 12, 2017 at the Episcopal Actor’s Guild NYC

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Hedy Lamarr Bombshell @Tribeca Film Fest Episode099

Hedy Lamarr ImageWhile most films we’ve seen at Tribeca Film Festival depended upon programmer scheduling to fit with our own, there were several that fit perfectly with the women in film line up that I focus on. Yuri Turchyn found the most appropo music for this episode. Opening  starts with Music for Hedy (unknown); You Stepped Out of a Dream (Johnny Mathis); For Ice Mother, a Czech film (Tribeca Award Winner for Screenwriting) surrounding an older women’s rebirth and renaissance following a chance meeting with ice swimmers, we hear opening from the Moldau (Smetana); Do not listen to other reviews or poorly written program descriptions otherwise almost didn’t go see November, an Estonian film (Tribeca Award Winner for Cinematography) that encompasses Slavic folk music, legendary and pagan rites that drives women in their seasonal lives and loves. Closing theme finds full circle in Music for Hedy.

Punk Rock Music in Film@Tribeca FilmFestivViews Episode 098

Friday Night Opening Weekend at Tribeca Film Festival 2017 was a one of a kind cinematic experience under Special Screenings The Public Image is Rotten combining performance and after the film screening conversation with John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten, original front man for the punk rock band, the Sex Pistols. After their break up in late 70s, he emerged as the lead singer of Public Image Ltd (PiL), continuing in an unconventional sight and sound style and structure.  There are no copy bands of the Sex Pistols or PiL and there’s a reason why– each performance is unique and unto itself.

From the beginning, punk rock became the voice for artists breaking free from a mainstream format and the record companies’ stranglehold on their creative artistry and earnings.  As Lydon recalls the many ups and downs of a live music performer’s lifestyle– from fellow band members comings and goings to the vastly changed music business landscape– his pondering becomes a poetic musing on survival and continuing performances as one artist with a decidedly different Bohemian lifestyle.

Tabbert Fiiller, former bassist for the band MaxSinger Z makes his directorial debut taking the audience on a remarkable free-from ride through the personal and professional POVs of Lydon and his band mates. I love the hair.